Scrapbook Mistakes Beginners Make

scrapbook cartoon 2 Scrapbook Mistakes Beginners Make

Scrapbook crafting has exploded over the past several years . . . both crafters and suppliers.  This trend does not seem to be slowing down.  So, if you are new to this special craft of creating books filled with pictures embellished to tell wonderful and heartfelt stories, you would be well to review this common mistakes beginners make when getting started.

Understanding and correcting these common mistakes often made by beginning scrapbook crafters can save you time and money.

Failing To Follow Your Own Style

Too often beginning scrapbook crafters just try to duplicate designs and layouts down by others.  “Duplication is the best form of flattery.”  This statement holds a great deal of truth, but the benefactor is someone else.

When you create your pages incorporate your own personality: colors, shapes,  embellishments that are to your liking–that you feel helps best express the theme of your page or book.  You certainly have freedom to use an idea you’ve seen, but always try to add your own little twist or improvement to it.

Not Recognizing “A Little Goes A Long Ways”–Embellishments for Added Decoration

Over doing pages with too many embellishments will detract from the focus of your page–telling the story with your pictures.  Colors, embellishment and journaling are important, but use moderation.  Each of the enhancing elements should help, not drown-out, the story your trying to share on your page and in your book.  Over doing things is easy because there are so many little touches you can purchase to “spruce-up” your pages.  Keep it simple, is good counsel as you begin.  A couple of accents, some well thought out words to journal are the pure essence of success.

Not Using A Color Scheme–Which Help To Bring Focus To Your Page/Book’s Theme

Too much color, or too many colors can confuse viewers.  When selecting your colors follow the basic color scheme (see article on Color) to help you add harmonizing colors.  If you’re using color photos pick a color from the picture that best focuses on the story you are telling with your page.

Understand colors help to enhance and focus attention when properly used.  They can imply a mood: formal, fun, funny, serious, etc.

Black and white photos basically are neutral–thus most any color will not clash with them.  You may want to use colors your perceive items in a black and white photo may be to invoke a specific feeling or look.

Place your photos on several different colors of paper to see which you feel the most comfortable with, and you feel helps you in your story telling.  Patterned paper may have a good blend of colors, but can also be too busy for a particular set of photos.

Using Too Many Shapes

As you design and construct your scrapbook pages, like much of the counsel here, be frugal in the types and number of shapes you use.  When cropping your photos, simple shapes work well . . . round, ovals, oblong, etc. help break the monotony of sharp cornered squares and rectangles.

Not Following Basic Balance or Symmetry Rules

As you design your pages you’ll want to follow the basic rules of balance and symmetry–the “Rule of Thirds.”  For specific guidelines and help in this area check these two articles: “Balancing Your Scrapbook Page Layouts” and “More Information About Symmetry in Scrapbooking.”

Knowing Which Paper To Use–Patterned Paper Versus A Solid Color Paper

There are many wonderful patterned papers available for your use . . . some which are theme oriented.  They come in small, medium and large patterns.  Be sure to mat your photos–especially when using patterned paper–with a complimentary solid color matting to one of the colors in your patterned paper.

Be sensitive in your selection of a patterned paper.  Don’t choose a pattern that is too busy for your there and focus.  Sometimes a busy pattern adds to your page’s focus, but more often than not you will overwhelm your photos with too busy a paper selection.

A conservative orientation will always serve you well–especially as you get started in this fun craft.  Plain papers would fall into that conservative vain.  Color selection would be the significant determining factor in your selection of a plain paper for your page.

Failing To Use Grouping Elements on Your Scrapbook Pages

In the art world there is a rule about “odd numbers.”  Following this rule will be helpful.  Visually, the eye sees things more comfortably when they are grouped in odd numbers.  Whether you are selecting the photos to use on a page or the various embellishments to add keep them in odd number groupings.

In the case of photos, don’t overload your page with too many photos–three works well and allows ample room for journaling and the addition of some embellishment.  If you have more than three photos you want to use consider a second page.

Don’t make your pages too garish with an over abundance of buttons, beads, eyelets, etc.  As has been noted earlier–a little goes a long ways.

Not Using Modest Repetition Which Can Work Wonders on Your Pages

As you create your scrapbook pages be sure to consider repeating elements and features from your photographs.  By doing so you bring greater focus and attention to the theme you are presenting.  Colors, as noted previously noted is one element.  Consider natural items-dried flowers, leaves, etc., or buttons, pins, etc.  These repeated items should be drawn from the photo primarily, and help to add attention to your focus otherwise you could just be adding clutter.

Lack of Journaling

Pictures say a thousand words, but sometimes you still have to say something, and in scrapbooks we do that via journaling.  Journal entries should help clarify or add unknown information to your page.  Quotes and facts are keys to viewers finding a greater appreciation for the theme and focus of your page.  Identifying names, dates, places and other pertinent information about your photos is most helpful.  Don’t assume everyone knows what you know about the photos on your page.  Any helpful descriptive information will help enhance the value of your page.

When journal entries are made you certainly can use stamps, stickers and other mediums to say what you want to say.  Different fonts can also add a touch of elegance to your page.

Failing to journal using your own penmanship is a major mistake.  Doing so lends a personal touch.  Remember, your pages should be an extension of who you are–not someone else.  Just make sure your journaling is legible–printing is best, but cursive will work if viewers can easily read it.  If you have to, because your best penmanship lacks, you may want to have someone else do the hand journaling . . . a family member, friend, etc.

Trying To Acquire Too Many Supplies and Tools

This may seem like an odd error to make.  Beginners should go from the simple to the complex over time.   Real scrapbook creativity comes when you have to work with a  small amount of supplies.  The biggest factor here is cost.  If you rush out and “buy everything under the sun” you will expend a fair amount of cash–which may not be in your budget.  There are so many things you may want to have–pace yourself.  If for some reason, heaven for bid, you loose interest in creating scrapbook pages, you may have invested a lot of money and little to show for it.   Add to your cache of supplies and tools over time.  These additions may be more evident after more experience has been gained.

Not Attending Workshops and Classes

Beginning scrapbook crafters would do well to attend as many classes and workshops as time and finances will allow.  Expanding your knowledge and experience is very helpful.  Being around other fellow scrappers helps build confidence and enthusiasm for your craft.  Some of the larger scrapbook suppliers put on programs throughout the year in various places across the country.  Your local craft supplies stores may offer “crop days.”  There are retreats you can go to.  All of these are great sources of information about new products and new techniques.

Failing To Have Fun

If you’re not having fun creating your scrapbook masterpiece then why are you involved?  The more fun you have, the better your output will be, both in quantity and quality.  Because through scrapbook pages you are telling a story you want to preserve for others, you should have fun sharing your ideas on those pages.  If you find this craft to be a drudgery, you may well be served to leave the history and story telling to others in your family. . . share what you have, but let them do the creative work.  Be engaged, but be happy!!!

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Ron on March 31st, 2011 | File Under Basics, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

7 Scrabpook Mistakes To Avoid

caution sign 7 Scrabpook Mistakes To Avoid

While scrapbooking is a wonder art craft, there are pitfalls scrappers can do that either add cost or diminish from your finished product.  Understanding these mistakes that many of us make at one time or another can help us avoid them when we see them.  Part of the problem stems from the creative genius each crafter has . . . or at least the think they have.  Add the myriad of materials and products you can use to create, enhance and embellish your pages, and you have the potential for the beginnings of trouble.

Consider these faux pas as a beginning to mistakes often made by scrapbook crafters:

Being Organized

A major mistake scrapbook crafters make is being unorganized . . . clutter being a primary factor, and not knowing what supplies and tools you have being another.  When possible, have a designated scrapping area where you regularly work.  Store your tools and supplies in a designated area in and around your work space.  Structure your organization by putting those items you use most frequently in the most convenient and easily accessible place near your work space.

Keep your work space neat and clean.  Avoid letting clutter pile up around your work space.  Clean your work area frequently.  Do your best to let material gather on your works space that could be transferred to scrapbook pages–i.e. glue, glitter, etc.

Using The K I S S – Keep It Simple Stupid – Principal

In the beginning of our scrapbook and personal card crafting this principal is easy to follow because we generally lack knowledge, supplies and tools to do much else than be simple.  As we acquire more knowledge, supplies and tools we tend to increase what we feel we need to complete our pages and cards.  Too often we go over board in the process.  We add too much of one thing or another because we have it and we can (no overly restrictive rules to abide by).

We have to remember what our goal is in creating a page or card.  Once we have our goal defined then we have to make sure we do only what is required to create the end product.  Too much focus on one thing, or the wrong thing, can distract from our original goal.  What we do as we create our project is let the object of our page or card shine through.  In the case of scrapbooking we need to focus on the pictures (see below).  On cards, we need to focus on the purpose of the card–generally what it says and how you display what you want to say.

Forgetting Scrapbooks Are All About Pictures and Telling Stories

The center of attention of each scrapbook page should be directed to the photos you have selected. These selected photographs should in someway tell a story or convey some thought to the viewer. Everything you add to these thoughtful pictures should help enhance the story or thought they are meant to share with others. Adding too much clutter (embellishment) can over power what your pictures can easily say–so much so that the photos have little value for your page. You can vary the placement on the page or the size of the photo you wish to use to add variety. Select colors that also help enhance your photos. Where black and white photos are used, you may have to imagine the dominant colors in the photo–green grass, autumn colored trees, color of a persons hair, etc.

Not Cropping Photos To Eliminate Unwanted Elements and Help Vary Photos Sizes

Photographs are seldom taken with the specific purpose of mounting them in a scrapbook–although that can happen. Most pictures are taken to capture a moment in history or a scene for others to enjoy later . . . when the benefit of the scene or moment is no longer available. So as we consider what a particular page’s story or thought must convey, we may need to remove aspects that appear, but are not needed or are unwanted, in a picture we plan to use.  Cropping simply allows you to select the most important elements from your picture and allows you to fit pictures more comfortably on a page.

Failing To Use Archival (Acid & Lignin Free) Quality Supplies

If your goal in creating a scrapbook is to provide a story or thought for long term view, you must also consider the preserving nature of using materials that will last and not damage your crafted pages.  Papers, adhesives and embellishments which contain acid will cause damage to your pages over time.  Making sure your supplies are free from acid and lignin.  Most products sold in scrapbook and craft stores are free of these elements, but be sure to check the labels and packaging to be sure.  If there is no notation indicating the item is free of these harmful items, don’t use them.  Again, because of the explosion of scrapbooking in recent years most reputable scrapbook supply sources are sure to make their products acid and lignin free–BUT ALWAYS CHECK THEM!

Photos will disintegrate naturally over time, but more quickly when acid is present.  Using acid free products and lignin free paper will help retard this process.  Ensure your papers and products that will be used on or near photos are labeled “photo safe.”

Failing To Journal On Your Pages

Don’t assume viewers of your scrapbook pages will know what you know about your pictures. Embellishments can help you say what you want them to know, but nothing falls short of writing what you want them to know. Journaling adds depth and meaning to photographs. You can share the where, when, who and what of a photo. Time diminishes our own memory, so jotting down simple details will help us as we view these pages for our own pleasure, or sharing them with others. Be sure to include such things as dates, places, names of people and special thoughts you have about a particular photo.

When journaling, you can use “produced” writing, but the best and most endearing journaling will come from your own hand. Make every effort to write in your own thoughts using your own penmanship. Printing is the most legible, but sometimes a cursive note is what’s needed–just make sure others can read it too, otherwise the effect may be lost.

Not Considering Learning From Classes and Workshops

Even the most experienced of scrapbook crafters may think they have all the knowledge and experience they need, but because of the continued development and production of new products and services for scrapbooker they can easily find themselves behind in the craft.

Beginners should take advantage of gaining as much knowledge through classes and workshops as time and finances will allow. Working with knowledgeable and experienced crafters will save you time, money and many mistakes from the school of “hard knocks.” You’ll know when you need to taper off, or become more selective about the classes and workshops you may need to attend as time goes on.

Classes and workshops help keep your crafting skills sharp. You will learn about the latest methods, supplies and tools to help you in creating your scrapbook masterpieces. Sharing your knowledge and talent with others is a great way to further expand your scrapbook association with fellow scrappers.

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Ron on March 28th, 2011 | File Under Basics, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Eyelete Setters for Scrapbooking

While eyelets have been around for what seems ions of time, they have on recently become a standard fixture for scrapbook and personal card crafters. We have the newest innovations in eyelet tools to thank for this evolution. The hand crimp eyelet setter, while useful for many applications, has limits because of the lack of being able to set eyelets much beyond factions of an inch from the border.

Our newest iterations of the eyelet and punch setter tools has expanded our capacity to place eyelets just about anywhere we choose on our scrapbook pages and personal cards. Having one of these versatile tools in your menagerie of helps is almost a no brainer. There are three eyelet products that should be able to accommodate your crafting needs:

Clikit from Karen Foster Design

clikit eyelet setter Eyelete Setters for Scrapbooking 

Now you can set eyelets, punch holes and emboss–quietly–with the help of Karen Foster Design’s Clikit multi-purpose spring action tool. This patent pending tool provides the same pressure as a hammer, but you only have to press Clikit’s handle.

Clikit comes with ten (10) interchangeable tips–including a duel tip; lacing tip; an eyelet splitter tip; an eyelet rounder tip; a piercing tool; six (6) hole punching tips (from 2 mm to 5 mm in diameter); a starter set of two (2) sie of eyelets; a punch pad; and complete instructions–all in a custom wooden box. Additional embossing alphabets and six icon sets can be purchased separately.

How to set an eyelet using the Clikit Tool:

  • Place you item to receive the eyelet on the setting mat that comes with the tool kit.
  • Select the appropriate size tip for making the needed hole to receive the eyelet.
  • Place the tool on the item you’re punching the hole in– where you want the hole to be and press down on the toll handle until you hear the click of the completed punch.  For thick or layered items you’ll want to keep the tool in place to allow for another push on the tool to complete the hole through all the material.  You may have to do this a couple of times to complete the hole.
  • Select the eyelet you wish to use and place the eyelet into the hole you’ve just created with your Clikit Tool.  Holding the eyelet in place, flip your material over and rest it on your setting mat.
  • Change the hole making tip in your Clikit Tool to one of the two eyelet setting tips.
  • Place the tool with the new tip down onto  the backside of the eyelet protruding through your hole and press down on the tool until you hear the click.  You may need to set the tool more than once to spread the eyelet open (securing your project with the eyelet).

In addition to setting eyelets, you can emboss metal  and stitch–just follow the instructions provided.

Instant Setter from Making Memories

eyelet setter mat box set Eyelete Setters for Scrapbooking

Instant Setter from Making Memories is an easy tool to use. The Instant Setter has a magnetic head for easy tip changes and an adjustable tension control.

The kit includes:

  • 3 hole punch tips
  • 4 setting tips (punch and setting tip sizes are: 1/16, 1/8, 3/16)
  • A cone tip that works with the Stamping Set (for paper or ribbon weaving and corner slot punching)
  • A setting mat, and
  • An adjustable spring loaded setting handle/tool with tension control for easy hole punching and eyelet setting.
  • All of these components come in a tin storage container.

Silent Setter from Provo Craft

silent setter Eyelete Setters for Scrapbooking 

Provo Craft’s Slient Setter Hammerless Eyelet Tool Set will help you papercrafters set eyelets without the bother and noisy process of pounding your setter to set eyelets. Now all you need to do is push and twist the selected punch tip through your project to create a hole. With the magnetized tips, changing to an appropriate sized setting tip is simple and quick. After creating your hole and inserting your chosen eyelet simply give a push down on your tool with the setting tip to secure the eyelet.

Provo Craft’s Silent Setter Hammerliess Eyelet Tool Set includes:

  • The Silent Setter Tool
  • Three (3) sizes of punch tips
  • A mini craft mat
  • 50 eyelets in assorted colors
  • A zippered carrying case (measures: 2-1/2″ by 5-1/4″ by 10-3/4″inces).

 

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Ron on March 25th, 2011 | File Under Cards and Invitations, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbooking Retreats

Getting Away to Scrapbook and Create Personal Cards

Just about every serious scrapbook and personal card crafter has considered sneaking off to a secluded dedicated place where they can get totally engrossed in there crafting. Retreats are one way to get away to do just that. There are advantages and disadvantages to going to a retreat to work on your craft. Here are some tidbits of the why’s and why nots:

Reason to go to a retreat:

  • The Prime reason to go to a retreat would be to engage in your scrapbooking craft by removing distractions at home.
  • The opportunity to be around others with similar interests:
    • The chance to share talent and information with others, and
    • To learn new techniques and tips from others.
  • The chance to see, and perhaps use, new tools and supplies, in addition to sharing what you may have to offer.
  • Perhaps the chance to see and experience other sites and activities where the retreat is located–a mini-vacation.
  • Not having to worry about preparing food or taking care of housekeeping chores.
  • Opportunity to participate in classes to learn more.

Reasons Against A Retreat:

  • Cost
  • Time – requires too much time, or not enough time based on your needs.
  • Location is not where you’d like to go–too close or too far away.
  • Number of participants–too few or too many.
  • Lack of services, tools and supplies, which might require you to have to take more than you would want to take.
  • Lack of classes or learning experiences.

Other Considerations:

Be sure you understand what is being offered by the retreat.  What services are provided for your fee:  Food, lodging (private room or dorm style–where you may have to bring your own bedding, etc.), supplies and tools they offer to use–or do they rent them, and are there items for sale?  Where is the retreat located–is it close to an airport if you’re flying, and do they offer pick-up service or do you need to rent a car?  What are their group rates (and the minimum number to create a group-you may want to do this to reduce costs)?

Be sure to understand the “fine print” when signing up.  The primary concern would be the cancellation costs should that be necessary.

By-all-means be sure to correspond with the retreat by phone or email to ensure you have all the details clear in your mind.

Assuming you’ve decided going to a Scrapbooking Retreat is the thing for you, where do you go.  First, check with your local scrapbook supply stores.  They often have listings of retreats in you area.  IF you are looking for sites in other states, here are a few links to retreats you may want to consider:

This list is not all inclusive, but should get you started on your search for a retreat or event that will suit your needs.

Geographic Location

Website Links

 
 
 
 

 

map united states Scrapbooking Retreats

United States

 

Scrapbook Retreat Directory
Scrapbooking-Directory
CK Scrapbook Events and Conventions
Scrapbook EXPO
 
 
 
 

 

map alabama Scrapbooking Retreats

Alabama

 

Paper Crafter’s Corner
Backpage.com
Magnolia Park Retreat
 
 
 
 

 

map alaska Scrapbooking Retreats

Alaska

 

 Alaskan Leopard
Alaska Highland Glen
 
 
 
 

 

map arizona Scrapbooking Retreats

Arizona

 

My Scrapbook Retreat
Sedona Scrapbooking Retreats
Two Peas in a Bucket
 

 

map arkansas Scrapbooking Retreats

Arkansas

 

Scrapbook Patch
The Scrapbook Attic and More
Croppin Train
Sassy Scraps
 

 

map california Scrapbooking Retreats

California

 

Scrapbook Crops and Events
Fullerton CM Scrapbook Meet Up
Wrightwood Guest Ranch
Scrap-N-Away
Scrapin’ Escapes
Meet-ups Scrapbooking Retreats
Camp Get Away
Crop Til You Drop
 

 

map canada Scrapbooking Retreats

Canada

 

Crop Across Canada
Unique Country Retreat
The Art House Studio (Home of Scrapbooking Retreats and Crops)
Memory Workshop
Scrapbook Crops
 

 

map colorado Scrapbooking Retreats

Colorado

 

Scrappy’s Retreat
My Scrapbook Retreat
Stamping To See You
 

 

map connecticut Scrapbooking Retreats

Connecticut

 

Captain Stannard House
Celebrate Memories
Scrappetizer
See Also New England Scrapbook Retreats
 

 

map delaware Scrapbooking Retreats

Delaware

 

Cropology.com – Wilmington, DE
See Also Mid-Atlantic Scrapbook Retreats
 

 

map florida Scrapbooking Retreats

Florida

 

All Seasons Scrapbook Resort
Hypolita Villa
Nana’s Scrapbook Retreat
CK Scrapbook Convention – Jacksonville
Scrapbook EXPO
PaperCrafter’s Corner – Florida
 

 

map gulf states Scrapbooking Retreats

Gulf States (Highlighted in Red)

 

Scrap Camp
Gulfcoast Stampers and Scrappers – Naples
Scrap & Paper Corner
HobNob Gulf Shores
 

 

map georgia Scrapbooking Retreats

Georgia

 

Camp Crop Alot
The Croppin Cabin
Scrappin Cabins
Legacy Lodge Scrappin Retreats
 

 

map hawai Scrapbooking Retreats

Hawai

 

No Current Posted Retreat Offerings
 

 

map idaho Scrapbooking Retreats

Idaho

 

Down-at-a-Hot Springs
Winchester Lodge
 

 

map illinois Scrapbooking Retreats

Illinois

 

Let’s Get Croppin
The Paper Doll House
River House
Heart and Soul Memories
A Passion for Scrappin
 

 

map indiana Scrapbooking Retreats

Indiana

 

In At Windmere
Crop-A-Doodle_Do
Girls Night Inn
Memories Retreats Bed & Breakfast
Michelle’s Memory Loft
Bear-Scrap Retreat
 

 

map iowa Scrapbooking Retreats

Iowa

 

PJ’s and Pigtails
Craft Cottage
Iowa Regular Baptist Camp
 

 

map kansas Scrapbooking Retreats

Kansas

 


Wishes of the Heart
Maple Memories Craft House
The Scrapbook Inn
 

 

map kentucky Scrapbooking Retreats

Kentucky

 

Scrappers Getaway
Scrapbook Memories
Hummingbird Hills Retreat
Around the Corner Scrapbooking Retreats
 

 

map louisiana Scrapbooking Retreats

Louisiana

 

Camp Crop A Lot
Pine Lily Retreat
The Acadiana Croppers
Memory Mania
 

 

map maine Scrapbooking Retreats

Maine

 

Point Sebago
Camp Cedarbrook
White Cedar Inn
 

 

map maryland Scrapbooking Retreats

Maryland

 

Cropmania
Ocean Retreats
All-day and Weekend Scrapbooking Events
Creative Crops
 

 

map massachusetts Scrapbooking Retreats

Massachusetts

 

Scrap-A-Way
SBV Scrapbook Events
Crazy For Croppin
Heirloom Pro
 

 

map michigan Scrapbooking Retreats

Michigan

 

Memory Makers Retreat
Great Scrapbook Events
Quick Quotes Private Reserve Weekend
The Gathering Place White Lake
Scrap Palace of Romeo
 

 

map mid atlantic states Scrapbooking Retreats

Mid-Atlantic States (Highlighted in Blue)

 

Creative Expressions
Get Croppin
Scrapatoulas Street
 

map minnesota Scrapbooking Retreats

Minnesota

 

Duluth Scrapbook Retreat
Breezy Meadow Retreat
Forest Haven Retreat
Skyline Vacation Rental
The Pine City Scrapbook Company
Craft Directory
 

 

map mississippi Scrapbooking Retreats

Mississippi

 

Mid South Scrappers
Crop Connection
 

map missouri Scrapbooking Retreats

Missouri

 

Koinania Valley Ranch
Scrapbook Generation
Just Croppin
 

map montana Scrapbooking Retreats

Montana

 

Priceless Scrapbooks Etc
Wispering Pines Retreat
Lake Ellen Camp
 

map rocky mountain states Scrapbooking Retreats

Rocky Mountain States

 

Mountains and Memories
The Gingerbread Cottage
D’Arcy’s Heavenly Retreats
Tintic Goldminers Inn
 

map nebraska Scrapbooking Retreats

Nebraska

 

Scrap-A-Teers
Calvin Crest Camp
Scrapping U.S.A
 

map nevada Scrapbooking Retreats

Nevada

 
Rubber Stamp and Scrapbook Expo
Papercrafter’s Corner of Utah & Idaho
Scrap Crackle Crop
 

map new england states Scrapbooking Retreats

New England States

Crazy for Croppin – Cape Cod
The Quail Hollow Inn – Chester, Vermont

Austin Hill Inn – Mount Snow, Vermont
Celebrate Memories New England Scrapbook Weekend – West Greenwich, Rhode Island
 

 

map new hampshire Scrapbooking Retreats

New Hampshire

 

Camp Spofford
 

 

map new jersey Scrapbooking Retreats

New Jersey

 

Ain’t She Crafty
Scrapitizer’s “Cream of the Crop”
N J Crop Weekends
 

 

map new mexico Scrapbooking Retreats

New Mexico

 

The Inspired ReTreat
 

 

map new york Scrapbooking Retreats

New York

 

Paper Angel Craft RetreatsCrop A Lot
New York Scrapbooking Retreats
Meet-ups Queens Sassy Scrappers Group
 

 

map north carolina Scrapbooking Retreats

North Carolina

 

CropCircles Nationwide Scrapbook RetreatsThe Country Crop Retreat
Scrappin Cabins
Matthews Manor B&BElite Scrapbooking Retreat
 

 

map north dakota Scrapbooking Retreats

North Dakota

 

Dakota GetawayCrystal Springs Baptist Camp
 

 

map ohio Scrapbooking Retreats

Ohio

 

A Crop For All Seasons
Zane Trace Inn and Craft Farm
Stratton House Inn
Leaving A Legacy Retreats
My Hobby Farm Retreat
 

 

map oklahoma Scrapbooking Retreats

Oklahoma

 

Scrappin Pad
Retreat Inn
 

 

map oregon Scrapbooking Retreats

Oregon

 

Scrappy Chicks Scrapbook Retreats
East Sode Scrappers Scrapbook Retreats
Scappoose Creek Inn
Scrap and Paper Corner (CK Srapbook Convention)
 

 

map pennsylvania Scrapbooking Retreats

Pennsylvania

 

Hobby House Retreat
Scrap and Paper Corner (CK Srapbook Convention)
Fancy That Scrapbook
Denise’s Crop Cave and Scrapbook Retreats
Local Memories of Lancaster
 

 

map rhode island Scrapbooking Retreats

Rhode Island

 

Rhode Island Scrapaway
Celebrate Memories
Cropitopia Get-A-Ways
 

 

map south carolina Scrapbooking Retreats

South Carolina

 

Got Memories
Scrapbook Cottage
Scrappy Angles
 

 

map south dakota Scrapbooking Retreats

South Dakota

 

The Prairie House Manor
Lutheran Outdoors in South Dakota Retreats
Meet Up Retreat – Souix Falls
Meet Up Retreat – Coleman
 

map tennessee Scrapbooking Retreats

Tennessee

Mama Bear’s Scrapbooking Retreats
Wispering Winds Scrapbook Retreat
Petticoat Junction Retreat House & Scrapbook Haven
Scrappin In The City
Wispering Winds Scrapbook Retreat
 

 

map texas Scrapbooking Retreats

Texas

 

Scrap HappyLone Star Retreat and Events Center
Scrapbook Heaven
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Utah

 

D’Arcy’s Heavenly Scrapbook Retreats
Paper Crafters Corner of Nevada and UtahRed Rooster Scrapbook Barn Retreat
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The Quail Hollow Inn
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Fogcreek Lodge
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Ron on March 19th, 2011 | File Under Cards and Invitations, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

CutterPillar Pro Paper Trimmer/Cutter

cutterpillar pro cutter CutterPillar Pro Paper Trimmer/Cutter

CutterPillar™ Pro

The new products for scrapbook, personal card makers and paper crafters never seems to end.   Here is one of the newest of the paper cutter/trimmers on the market.   Here are some of the details on this newest cutter:

  • Lightweight aluminum construction for strength with soft rubber feet to lessen the cutter’s movement, and to protect table top surfaces.
  • There is a storage drawer  that will accommodate 12″ paper, extra batteries, or other items of your choosing.
  • Will trim a full 12″ sheet of paper down to even the smallest scrap safely and effortlessly.
  • There is a powerful LED light track which illuminates the cutting edge for accurate cuts (even double sided or up-side-down).
  • This cutter provides the best of both worlds with a gear driven rotary blade which passes smoothly by a stationary blade for clean cuts through nearly any paper stock.

Some additional general comments about this cutter/trimmer that may be useful for scrapbook and paper crafters:

The grid calibration markings on the cutting table measure only down to 1/4″ which some crafters may find a detraction.  Going down to 1/8″ markings would increase its functionality and accuracy for certain cuts.  That having been said, the CutterPillar™ Pro cuts smoothly.  You don’t need to put excessive pressure on the blade to cut–just glide the cutter along the cutting bar.  The back lighting is a nice feature to help you see where pieces you have cropped off went.  (The LED back light is powered by 5 AA batteries.) The construction of the cutter provides for a great deal of safety when cutting because so little of the blade is exposed to where a finger could be injured.  (The trimmer blade is on one side and a plastic housing on the other with very little of the cutting blade showing.)   This cutter/trimmer produces very clean cuts.  The drawer on the underside is a useful storage area for extra paper, scissors, etc.  There is a built-in handle on the box the cutter comes in for handy carrying. A great value for the price.

cutterpillar pro carrying case CutterPillar Pro Paper Trimmer/Cutter

Should you feel the need to have one of these super scrapbook cutting tools – click here!

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Ron on March 17th, 2011 | File Under Cards and Invitations, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbook Binding Methods – Rollabind

rollabind plastic Scrapbook Binding Methods   Rollabind

A little about Rollabind:

Rollabind is admired for its innovative binding systems, Rollabind has gained a following among multi-taskers searching for solutions that adapt to, rather than dictate, their lifestyles. Rollabind notebooks are used as diaries, personal journals, organizers, day planners and scrapbooks. Rollabind provides paper punches that allow you to create your own pages or insert any document into your notebook or scrapbook.

Rollabind is the most innovative organizational solution in the market with its trademarked binding system. Unlike conventional binding systems, Rollabind is an efficient solution, because it allows its users to replace, refill, interchange and rearrange their important information without damaging the integrity of the paper and without the trouble of having to take out other pages in the reorganization process.

  • Organizable
  • Customizable
  • Re-fillable
  • Re-placeable
  • Interchangeable
  • Upgradable
  • Lays Completely Flat
  • Pages Turn 360 degrees

rollabind process Scrapbook Binding Methods   Rollabind

Rollabind Process

RollaScrapbook® Our scrapbook products are the answer to all your project needs and is an efficient solution, because it allows it’s users to replace, refill, interchange and rearrange their important information without damaging the integrity of the paper and without the trouble of having to take out other pages in the reorganization process. Individuals and groups use our kits for organizing those boxes of photos, your children’s projects – scrap books of every kind are easily assembled with the Rollabind system!

Rollabind allows you to build your own personalized scrapbook exactly suited to match your requirements and style.  Check out this video:  How to Rollabind

These options may not be what you are looking for.  Click here to visit our web-page on other scrapbook binding options, or go to our alphabetical subject page above and click on the “S” to see information on other binding pages.

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Ron on February 10th, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Ways You Can Bind Your Scrapbooks

book binding types Ways You Can Bind Your Scrapbooks

Here are some ideas and tips on how you can bind your own scrapbooks as you produce them.

Some Book Binding Background

The craft of bookbinding originated in India, where religious sutra were copied onto palm leaves (cut into two, lengthwise) with a metal stylus. The leaf was then dried and rubbed with ink, which would form a stain in the wound. The finished leaves were given numbers, and two long twines were threaded through each end through wooden boards. When closed, the excess twine would be wrapped around the boards to protect the leaves of the book. Buddhist monks took the idea through modern Persia, Afghanistan, and Iran, to China in the first century BC.” – websters-online-dictionary.org.   (For more information on the history of binding go to http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definitions/bookbinding)

Book binding methods continued to evolve.  Some of these earliest attempts to bind pages together was simply lacing a cord through holes placed through the pages of the manuscript.  This process became more mechanized as the centuries wore on.  Sometime in the 1950′s the punch-and-bind- systems came about.  As the years progressed, so did the development of the binding machines.  Today, you can buy inexpensive and simple to operate binding systems.  We’ll share a few ideas to help you.

If you choose to construct and bind your own scrapbooks there are a few things you should consider before you get started.  Understanding the different types of binding methods would be helpful.  Generally, most scrapbooks have a couple of elements you would want in the end product:  be sturdy, be large enough and allow for inclusion of additional pages.  As you consider your scrapbook take into account how big you want your book to be–dimensions: height, width and thickness.  Each of these factors will help determine which of the binding options are best suited for your project.  Obviously, smaller books have less hindrances to produce.  Here are some of the binding options you could use:

The first 5 methods presented here are ones you would normally have done by professional binding services.

Case Binding -

case book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksCase binding is the type of binding most commonly used in hardcover books.  This process is an expensive option, but has long lasting durability.  The binding process is stitching together stacked signatures (folded sheets multiple times to create 4, 8, 16 or 32 page portions).  The stacked signatures are then sewn together and glued into a spin (book backing) along with a front and back cover.  Advantages:  strength and durability; Disadvantages: Lacks flexibility to lay open flat and doesn’t allow for additional inclusion of pages.  Case binding is not generally considered the most viable option for scrapbooks.

Perfect Binding -

perfect book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksPerfect binding is similar to Case Binding–where books are created by using stacked signatures.  The primary difference is in the binding.  In Perfect binding the stacked signatures elements are generally glued directly to the spin without stitching, however, stitching can be used.  Paperback books are an example of Perfect Binding.  Much like the Case binding, Perfect bound books have a measure of durability, but  generally do not lay flat, and don’t accept inclusion pages.

Lay-Flat Binding -

lay flat book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThe process of binding using the Lay-Flat method is similar to the Case and Perfect binding process except the use of a flexible glue used only on the edges of the spine allow the books to lie flat.  Cookbooks and technical manuals are examples of Lay-Flat bound books.   This method, like Case and Perfect binding does not allow for the inclusion of additional pages, and thus, is not considered a viable method for use in scrapbook bind–unless the size of the scrapbook is well designed and no additional page inclusion will be needed.

Saddle-Stitching -

saddle stitch book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThis method of binding is similar to the previous three methods accept the signatures are nested one inside another versus being stacked one signature on top of another, and then stitched through the fold with thin wire staples.  This method is possible for completed scrapbooks with long term need in mind.  Saddle-stitched books can lie flat , but have no spine upon which a title could be printed.  These bound books are generally limited to no more than 80 pages.

Side-Stitching -

side stitch book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksSide stitched books are created and bound by assembling loose sheets of paper and stapling them together, or literally stitching them.  A cover can  enfold the bound stack and glued.  Depending on the bound thickness, the spine may be thick enough to allow for a side stitch book binding2 Ways You Can Bind Your Scrapbooksprinted title.  This method is not well suited for scrapbooks because the binding does not allow for the book to lie flat or for inclusion of additional pages.  Magazines or booklets, like National Geographic utilize this method of binding.


The next set of methods presented here are ones you could produce on your own (with the assistance of some simple tools), or purchased inexpensively from an office supply or craft store.

GBC Binding (sometimes referred to as comb binding) -

comb book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksOne of the advantages of this binding method is in the ability of the completed book to lie flat–something scrapbook crafters desire.  The binding process is fairly simple.  Holes are punched along the side where the binding is preferred.  A plastic comb (a cylinder with plastic fingers that are flexible to open) is inserted into the corresponding holes.  Another feature or benefit to paper crafters is the ability to add pages to the completed project.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Wire-O Binding -

wire o book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksWire-O binding is a succession of  parallel looped wire affixed along a wire which are passed through holes punched in the stacked papers–similar to the GBC Binding method noted above.   This method of binding has size limitations for its use . . . less than for the GBC Binding method, but does allow for the addition of pages not to exceed its size limitation, or for a title to be placed on the binding.  This binding does allow for the completed project to lie flat when open.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Wire Spiral Binding -

wire spiral book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThe Spiral binding method is very similar to the Wire-O method accept a spiral wire is worked through the corresponding holes punched on one side of the project.  This binding does not allow being able to put a title on the binding–which could be a deterrent for some.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Plastic Coil Binding -

spiral book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThis binding method is the same as the Spiral Binding method noted above except a plastic spiral material is used versus wire which can be crushed.  The flexibility of the plastic gives the finished book a measure of versatility wire does not give, and you can select from a variety of colors.  If the wire spiral is crushed the opening and closing of the book is compromised.

Tape Binding -

tape book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksTape binding is a method, sometimes referred to as Thermabind or thermal tape binding,  is a process which uses a fabric tape strip that is pre-coated with a durable, heat–activated glue to hold or bind the pages together.  This type of binding is  not normally used in scrapbook binding.    The glue strip tape is wrapped around the front & back covers of the book block, extending to about a half-inch to an inch on the back and front sheets.  The glue strip is then heated to bond the tape to the book.  The best practice is to use a tape binding machine (The cost of a binding machine generally makes this process cost prohibitive for most scrapbook applications–but machines can be purchased for as little as $99.)  which centers your book’s binding edge on the tape, and completes the process by melting the glue. The material becomes bound once the glue has cooled.  Thermal tape binding strips come in a variety of colors and size ranges to accommodate a variety of book thicknesses from 3 to 600 sheets of 20 lb.  paper.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Screw and Post Binding -

screw  post book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThe Screw and Post Binding method is one most familiar to scrapbook crafters.  These books are the “backbone” of the scrapbook portfolio.  They can be purchased for a nominal cost.  Their drawbacks can be in the lack of being able to customize or personalize them and the capacity limits.  Creating your own book using the Screw and Post Binding method is not difficult.  The process is very similar to side stitching process, but metal post and screws are used to bind your papers.  One nice element to this type bound book is the ability to add or remove pages easily.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Velo Binding -

velo book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThe Velo Binding method is identified by the flat plastic strip which runs the length of the bound edge on both the front and back sides of the book.  Thin pegs attach the two plastic strips  through the pages of the book.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Ring-binders -

ring bound book Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThe Ring-binder method is simple and straight forward.  Most of us are familiar with the ringed binders we use in school and at the office.  Usually made with 3 metal (sometimes plastic) rings enclosed in a cloth bound or vinyl cover.  Ring-binder’s are versatile and allow for ease in adding or removing pages.  These uncomplicated books can be purchased at a nominal price at many shops: craft, office supply, grocery stores, etc.

rollabind process1 Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksRollabind is admired for its innovative binding systems, Rollabind has gained a following among multi-taskers searching for solutions that adapt to, rather than dictate, their lifestyles. Rollabind notebooks are used as diaries, personal journals, organizers, day planners and scrapbooks. Rollabind provides paper punches that allow you to create your own pages or insert any document into your notebook or scrapbook.   Click here for more detailed information . . .

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Ron on February 4th, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbook Binding Methods – Screw and Post Binding

screw  post book binding1 Scrapbook Binding Methods – Screw and Post Binding

The Screw and Post Binding method is perhaps the most familiar to scrapbook crafters along with the ring-binder.  These books are the “backbone” of the scrapbook portfolio.  They can be purchased for a nominal cost.  Their drawbacks to “store bought albums” can be in the lack of being able to customize or personalize their covers, and their capacity limits.  Creating your own book using the Screw and Post Binding method is not difficult.  screw  post bound book graphic Scrapbook Binding Methods – Screw and Post BindingThe process is very similar to side stitching process (see article on Side Stitch Binding), but metal post and screws are used to bind your papers.  One nice element to this type bound book or album is the ability to add or remove pages easily.

Some basic information about binding screw and posts:

screw posts Scrapbook Binding Methods – Screw and Post Binding

Screw & Post Fasteners

  • These post and screws are sometimes referred to as Chicago binding screw or post clamp.
  • The most popular variety is made from aluminum, but can come in plastic, brass and steel–in addition to coming in colors.
  • The set come in two pieces–a binding screw and binding post or barrel post.  The binding screw is twisted, or screwed into the binding post.
  • The binding post or barrel come in various heights to provide appropriate paper capacities: 1/8″ up to 4″
  • The post or barrel is 3/16″ in diameter and will fit into 1/4″ punched or drilled holes, or the 5/16″ sized hole produced with a standard 3-hole paper punch.
  • The screw is 7/16′ in diameter.
  • You can purchase extensions to expand your scrapbooks/albums should the need arise.

These options may not be what you are looking for.  Click here to visit our web-page on other scrapbook binding options, or go to our alphabetical subject page above and click on the “S” to see information on other binding pages; or there are two good informational websites you can go to if you want to make your own scrapbook albums using Screw and Post binding with Instructables or Alternative Photography’s site.

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Ron on February 3rd, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

ring bound book1 Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

The Ring-binder method is simple and straight forward.  Most of us are familiar with the ringed binders we use in school and at the office.  Usually made with 3 metal (sometimes plastic) rings enclosed in a cloth bound or vinyl cover.  Ring-binder’s are versatile and allow for ease in adding or removing pages.  These uncomplicated books can be purchased at a nominal price at many shops: craft, office supply, grocery stores, etc.

binder ring round Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

Round Binder Ring

binder D ring Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

D-ring Binder

binder elliptical ring Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

Elliptical Ring Binder

binder single ring Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

Single Ring Binder

There are essentially three types of ring binders:  the ring binder (where the rings are cylindrical); the d-ring (where the ring has a straight elongated side to keep pages from rounding over; and elliptical overlapping ring (where the rings are cylindrical, usually made of plastic or PVC and the ends that open for page insertion lap over each other).  Which type you choose to use may be more dependent on the size and utility of your scrapbook.  Each of these options will accommodate page stacks up to 3″ (as measured from the top of the ring to the binder base.  For scrapbook use, you most likely wouldn’t want to use a ring binder over 2″.

For scrapbooks you want binders that will hold your 12″ x 12″ completed scrapbook pages.  These size binders will actually be larger than 12″ x 12″ with added size to keep your pages from being disturbed when handling.  Most commercial ring binders come with three rings.  Smaller sized binders may have only two.  Hand made ring binders can be made with loose leaf 3-ring binders (round or d-ring), elliptical rings, or 2 or three single rings.  The choice is yours.

These options may not be what you are looking for.  Click here to visit our web-page on other scrapbook binding options, or go to our alphabetical subject page above and click on the “S” to see information on other binding pages.

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Ron on February 2nd, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbook Binding Methods – GBC or Comb Binding

GBC Binding or Comb Binding

comb book binding1 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

One of the advantages of this binding method is for the ability of the completed book to lie flat–something scrapbook crafters desire.  The binding process is fairly simple.  Holes are punched along the side where the binding is preferred.  A plastic comb (a cylinder with plastic fingers that are flexible to open)  is inserted into the corresponding holes.  Another feature or benefit to paper crafters is the ability to add pages to the completed project.

GBC Binding (named because of the company GBC–a major binding machine and supply manufacturer) is one of several methods used for binding books–including scrapbooks.  The process of this type of book binding is relatively uncomplicated, but is best done with the help of a binding machine.

Comb binding utilizes round plastic spines in varying sizes and colors to create the bind.  These spines have 19 comb fingers for a standard U.S. letter sized sheet of paper (8 1/2″ x 11″).  Each comb of the spine is inserted into rectangular punched holes in the document to be bound.  The springy nature of the plastic cylinder of fingers retains the coil to hold the sheets together.

Here is how the Comb binding process is done:

Step 1

comb binding punched holes Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb BindingThe first step in binding your scrapbook will be to punch the holes on the spine side (where you want the binding to be) of your pages.  Here is where having a comb binding machine comes in handy.  A comb binding machine will produce uniform rectangular holes evenly spaced (approximately 19 holes for a standard U.S. letter sized[8 1/2" x 11"]  sheet of paper–which corresponds to the number of “fingers” on a binding comb ring.   When punching standard 12″ x 12″ scrapbook pages you will need to center the punches.  Most punching machines have a guide to allow for centering the punches on your sheets.  When punching the holes be careful not to over extend the capacity of the punching machine or tool.  You may well be better served to reduce the number of sheets you punch at a time.  What you want are clean, neat and uniform rectangular punches.  Imperfect punching will make your finished binding less functional.

Step 2

comb binding spines Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb BindingWith holes punched, you want to select a comb spine that will accommodate the size or thickness of your scrapbook to be bound.  When selecting your spine bigger is always better . . . allowing for easier opening and “paging”  or flipping through your pages without the spine catching your pages.  Comb spines come in thickness ranging from 3/16″ up to 2″ as standard, and in a wide array of colors.  The standard length of spines is 11″ which means on a 12″ x 12″ scrapbook page you will have to center your spine.  If you plan to add pages to your scrapbook, you will be best served to use a larger sized spine to accommodate these pages which may be added at some later date.

Step 3

This last step is the assembly of your bound book.  The fingers or combs on the binding spine open out.  You need to insert one finger into each punched hole through all of the pages of your book.  The fingers or comb should be rested under the spine to secure your pages.

comb bind step1 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

Machine opening the spine.

comb bind step2 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

Spine rings through holes.

comb bind step3 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

Rings closed on paper.

comb bind step4 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

Completed book.

 

The addition of a stiff cover and backing to your scrapbook can be added during the process noted above.  The backing should be the first page on the spine, followed by your scrapbook pages, and concluding with the cover page.

This method of scrapbook binding can be done without the use of a binding machine, but quality results are best obtained when a machine is used for punching and opening of the spine to insert your scrapbook pages.  Here are some machines that are reasonable in price for the serious scrapbook crafter who plans to do a fair amount of binding to justify the cost.  Click on the photograph to get details on the particular machine/system:

 GBC or Comb Binding Machines

 

GBC Manual Comb Binding Machine-C55

gbc manual binding machine C55  Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

GBC Manual Binding Machine C55

The GBC CombBind C55 manual plastic comb binding machine features a 5-sheet manual punch capacity plus 90-sheet binding capacity using plastic combs up to 1/2″. Rotary comb opening. Integrated carrying handle. Paper alignment guide.
GBC ProClick P50 Binding Machine

gbc proclick p50 binding machine   Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

GBC ProClick P50 Binding Machine

The GBC Proclick P50 Binding Machine is small enough to take with you in your car or even in your briefcase so that you can punch documents on the fly. The Proclick P50 uses a rotary punching mechanism that punches a 32 hole 3:1 pitch pattern that is compatible with GBC Proclick binding spines (It can even be used with 3:1 pitch color coil). Make a lasting impression with GBC’s fast, easy binding style. ProClick lasts pages lie flat with 360 degree rotation for convenient note taking and photocopying, and you can easily add and remove sheets with a ProClick editing tool. Binds up to 100 sheets.
GBC Manual Comb Binding Machine C110

gbc combind c110 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

GBC ComBind C110 Manual Machine

Ideal for moderate use. Punches up to 15 sheets manually and binds up to 300 sheets. Full size handle and separate bind lever maximizes efficiency. A comb selection guide makes it easy to select a comb size. Accommodates oversize and standard size covers.
Fellowes Manual Combing Machine

fellowes comb binding machine Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

Fellowes Manual Combing Machine

This manual binding machine is for occasional home, office, or student use, and will manually punch up to 7 sheets at a time.  This machine will bind up to 90 sheets with a 1/2” comb, and allows the user to punch and bind continuously for maximum productivity.  Paper is loaded vertically for accurate punch alignment.  There are adjustable edge guides to help  center documents with ease.  There is also a document thickness guide to help users select the proper comb width.  A built-in comb storage tray is provided for added convenience.

These options may not be what you are looking for.  Click here to visit our web-page on other scrapbook binding options, or go to our alphabetical subject page above and click on the “S” to see information on other binding pages.

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Ron on February 1st, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -