Simple Scrapbook Techniques – Card Stock

 

cardstock display Simple Scrapbook Techniques   Card Stock

Courtesy of Oriental Trading

In the beginning years of scrapbook crafting, card stock was the prime paper available and used by most crafters.  With the coming of printed papers many paper crafters abandoned the plain color card stock offerings.  Nothing against patterned papers, but there is a place–a significant one–for plain colored paper.

As you acquire your scrapbook and personal card making supplies, paper will obviously be a staple.  When choosing the primary papers you want to work with, and there are tons of choices out there, be sure to have ample supplies of card stock.

Beginning scrappers may be well served to “cut their teeth” using plain colored card stock on their initial scrapbook projects.  Card stock offers you a simple clean and fresh looking paper to begin your layout.  There is less time and focus needed to select accents and embellishments that won’t clash with a printed or patterned paper.  A beginning crafter need only concern themselves with an appropriate color, selected photographs, some journal entries and an accent or two to bring our your page’s theme.

With time and experience, paper crafters can expand their horizon.  They will learn balance, symmetry and color schemes that will allow them to begin mixing textures and patterns in their creations–but in the beginning they will do well to stay with simple elements.

cardstock scrap cutouts Simple Scrapbook Techniques   Card Stockcardstock photo frames Simple Scrapbook Techniques   Card StockCard stock holds a great deal of versatility.  In addition to being the backdrop of your scrapbook’s pages, with the help of scissors and die cuts, scraps of card stock can be the embellishment you need for a particular project.  This also extends the cost value of the card stock itself by making more use of the whole sheet for other than your page’s background.  Consider, too, using card stock for photo mats, journaling strips and blocks, tags and borders.  You’ll find more uses for this important material as your effort and experience increases.

Be sure the card stock you purchase is lignin and acid free.  If you purchase your paper from reputable scrapbook and craft supply stores or outlets (online), you should be comfortable their providing you with reliable card stock.

Scrapping can be tons of fun, but costly, if you let it.  Use these tips to help you enjoy your crafting and help reduce your expenses.

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Ron on April 13th, 2011 | File Under Basics, Cards and Invitations, Scrapbook Paper, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Eyelete Setters for Scrapbooking

While eyelets have been around for what seems ions of time, they have on recently become a standard fixture for scrapbook and personal card crafters. We have the newest innovations in eyelet tools to thank for this evolution. The hand crimp eyelet setter, while useful for many applications, has limits because of the lack of being able to set eyelets much beyond factions of an inch from the border.

Our newest iterations of the eyelet and punch setter tools has expanded our capacity to place eyelets just about anywhere we choose on our scrapbook pages and personal cards. Having one of these versatile tools in your menagerie of helps is almost a no brainer. There are three eyelet products that should be able to accommodate your crafting needs:

Clikit from Karen Foster Design

clikit eyelet setter Eyelete Setters for Scrapbooking 

Now you can set eyelets, punch holes and emboss–quietly–with the help of Karen Foster Design’s Clikit multi-purpose spring action tool. This patent pending tool provides the same pressure as a hammer, but you only have to press Clikit’s handle.

Clikit comes with ten (10) interchangeable tips–including a duel tip; lacing tip; an eyelet splitter tip; an eyelet rounder tip; a piercing tool; six (6) hole punching tips (from 2 mm to 5 mm in diameter); a starter set of two (2) sie of eyelets; a punch pad; and complete instructions–all in a custom wooden box. Additional embossing alphabets and six icon sets can be purchased separately.

How to set an eyelet using the Clikit Tool:

  • Place you item to receive the eyelet on the setting mat that comes with the tool kit.
  • Select the appropriate size tip for making the needed hole to receive the eyelet.
  • Place the tool on the item you’re punching the hole in– where you want the hole to be and press down on the toll handle until you hear the click of the completed punch.  For thick or layered items you’ll want to keep the tool in place to allow for another push on the tool to complete the hole through all the material.  You may have to do this a couple of times to complete the hole.
  • Select the eyelet you wish to use and place the eyelet into the hole you’ve just created with your Clikit Tool.  Holding the eyelet in place, flip your material over and rest it on your setting mat.
  • Change the hole making tip in your Clikit Tool to one of the two eyelet setting tips.
  • Place the tool with the new tip down onto  the backside of the eyelet protruding through your hole and press down on the tool until you hear the click.  You may need to set the tool more than once to spread the eyelet open (securing your project with the eyelet).

In addition to setting eyelets, you can emboss metal  and stitch–just follow the instructions provided.

Instant Setter from Making Memories

eyelet setter mat box set Eyelete Setters for Scrapbooking

Instant Setter from Making Memories is an easy tool to use. The Instant Setter has a magnetic head for easy tip changes and an adjustable tension control.

The kit includes:

  • 3 hole punch tips
  • 4 setting tips (punch and setting tip sizes are: 1/16, 1/8, 3/16)
  • A cone tip that works with the Stamping Set (for paper or ribbon weaving and corner slot punching)
  • A setting mat, and
  • An adjustable spring loaded setting handle/tool with tension control for easy hole punching and eyelet setting.
  • All of these components come in a tin storage container.

Silent Setter from Provo Craft

silent setter Eyelete Setters for Scrapbooking 

Provo Craft’s Slient Setter Hammerless Eyelet Tool Set will help you papercrafters set eyelets without the bother and noisy process of pounding your setter to set eyelets. Now all you need to do is push and twist the selected punch tip through your project to create a hole. With the magnetized tips, changing to an appropriate sized setting tip is simple and quick. After creating your hole and inserting your chosen eyelet simply give a push down on your tool with the setting tip to secure the eyelet.

Provo Craft’s Silent Setter Hammerliess Eyelet Tool Set includes:

  • The Silent Setter Tool
  • Three (3) sizes of punch tips
  • A mini craft mat
  • 50 eyelets in assorted colors
  • A zippered carrying case (measures: 2-1/2″ by 5-1/4″ by 10-3/4″inces).

 

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Ron on March 25th, 2011 | File Under Cards and Invitations, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

CutterPillar Pro Paper Trimmer/Cutter

cutterpillar pro cutter CutterPillar Pro Paper Trimmer/Cutter

CutterPillar™ Pro

The new products for scrapbook, personal card makers and paper crafters never seems to end.   Here is one of the newest of the paper cutter/trimmers on the market.   Here are some of the details on this newest cutter:

  • Lightweight aluminum construction for strength with soft rubber feet to lessen the cutter’s movement, and to protect table top surfaces.
  • There is a storage drawer  that will accommodate 12″ paper, extra batteries, or other items of your choosing.
  • Will trim a full 12″ sheet of paper down to even the smallest scrap safely and effortlessly.
  • There is a powerful LED light track which illuminates the cutting edge for accurate cuts (even double sided or up-side-down).
  • This cutter provides the best of both worlds with a gear driven rotary blade which passes smoothly by a stationary blade for clean cuts through nearly any paper stock.

Some additional general comments about this cutter/trimmer that may be useful for scrapbook and paper crafters:

The grid calibration markings on the cutting table measure only down to 1/4″ which some crafters may find a detraction.  Going down to 1/8″ markings would increase its functionality and accuracy for certain cuts.  That having been said, the CutterPillar™ Pro cuts smoothly.  You don’t need to put excessive pressure on the blade to cut–just glide the cutter along the cutting bar.  The back lighting is a nice feature to help you see where pieces you have cropped off went.  (The LED back light is powered by 5 AA batteries.) The construction of the cutter provides for a great deal of safety when cutting because so little of the blade is exposed to where a finger could be injured.  (The trimmer blade is on one side and a plastic housing on the other with very little of the cutting blade showing.)   This cutter/trimmer produces very clean cuts.  The drawer on the underside is a useful storage area for extra paper, scissors, etc.  There is a built-in handle on the box the cutter comes in for handy carrying. A great value for the price.

cutterpillar pro carrying case CutterPillar Pro Paper Trimmer/Cutter

Should you feel the need to have one of these super scrapbook cutting tools – click here!

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Ron on March 17th, 2011 | File Under Cards and Invitations, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbook Binding Methods – Rollabind

rollabind plastic Scrapbook Binding Methods   Rollabind

A little about Rollabind:

Rollabind is admired for its innovative binding systems, Rollabind has gained a following among multi-taskers searching for solutions that adapt to, rather than dictate, their lifestyles. Rollabind notebooks are used as diaries, personal journals, organizers, day planners and scrapbooks. Rollabind provides paper punches that allow you to create your own pages or insert any document into your notebook or scrapbook.

Rollabind is the most innovative organizational solution in the market with its trademarked binding system. Unlike conventional binding systems, Rollabind is an efficient solution, because it allows its users to replace, refill, interchange and rearrange their important information without damaging the integrity of the paper and without the trouble of having to take out other pages in the reorganization process.

  • Organizable
  • Customizable
  • Re-fillable
  • Re-placeable
  • Interchangeable
  • Upgradable
  • Lays Completely Flat
  • Pages Turn 360 degrees

rollabind process Scrapbook Binding Methods   Rollabind

Rollabind Process

RollaScrapbook® Our scrapbook products are the answer to all your project needs and is an efficient solution, because it allows it’s users to replace, refill, interchange and rearrange their important information without damaging the integrity of the paper and without the trouble of having to take out other pages in the reorganization process. Individuals and groups use our kits for organizing those boxes of photos, your children’s projects – scrap books of every kind are easily assembled with the Rollabind system!

Rollabind allows you to build your own personalized scrapbook exactly suited to match your requirements and style.  Check out this video:  How to Rollabind

These options may not be what you are looking for.  Click here to visit our web-page on other scrapbook binding options, or go to our alphabetical subject page above and click on the “S” to see information on other binding pages.

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Ron on February 10th, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Ways You Can Bind Your Scrapbooks

book binding types Ways You Can Bind Your Scrapbooks

Here are some ideas and tips on how you can bind your own scrapbooks as you produce them.

Some Book Binding Background

The craft of bookbinding originated in India, where religious sutra were copied onto palm leaves (cut into two, lengthwise) with a metal stylus. The leaf was then dried and rubbed with ink, which would form a stain in the wound. The finished leaves were given numbers, and two long twines were threaded through each end through wooden boards. When closed, the excess twine would be wrapped around the boards to protect the leaves of the book. Buddhist monks took the idea through modern Persia, Afghanistan, and Iran, to China in the first century BC.” – websters-online-dictionary.org.   (For more information on the history of binding go to http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definitions/bookbinding)

Book binding methods continued to evolve.  Some of these earliest attempts to bind pages together was simply lacing a cord through holes placed through the pages of the manuscript.  This process became more mechanized as the centuries wore on.  Sometime in the 1950′s the punch-and-bind- systems came about.  As the years progressed, so did the development of the binding machines.  Today, you can buy inexpensive and simple to operate binding systems.  We’ll share a few ideas to help you.

If you choose to construct and bind your own scrapbooks there are a few things you should consider before you get started.  Understanding the different types of binding methods would be helpful.  Generally, most scrapbooks have a couple of elements you would want in the end product:  be sturdy, be large enough and allow for inclusion of additional pages.  As you consider your scrapbook take into account how big you want your book to be–dimensions: height, width and thickness.  Each of these factors will help determine which of the binding options are best suited for your project.  Obviously, smaller books have less hindrances to produce.  Here are some of the binding options you could use:

The first 5 methods presented here are ones you would normally have done by professional binding services.

Case Binding -

case book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksCase binding is the type of binding most commonly used in hardcover books.  This process is an expensive option, but has long lasting durability.  The binding process is stitching together stacked signatures (folded sheets multiple times to create 4, 8, 16 or 32 page portions).  The stacked signatures are then sewn together and glued into a spin (book backing) along with a front and back cover.  Advantages:  strength and durability; Disadvantages: Lacks flexibility to lay open flat and doesn’t allow for additional inclusion of pages.  Case binding is not generally considered the most viable option for scrapbooks.

Perfect Binding -

perfect book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksPerfect binding is similar to Case Binding–where books are created by using stacked signatures.  The primary difference is in the binding.  In Perfect binding the stacked signatures elements are generally glued directly to the spin without stitching, however, stitching can be used.  Paperback books are an example of Perfect Binding.  Much like the Case binding, Perfect bound books have a measure of durability, but  generally do not lay flat, and don’t accept inclusion pages.

Lay-Flat Binding -

lay flat book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThe process of binding using the Lay-Flat method is similar to the Case and Perfect binding process except the use of a flexible glue used only on the edges of the spine allow the books to lie flat.  Cookbooks and technical manuals are examples of Lay-Flat bound books.   This method, like Case and Perfect binding does not allow for the inclusion of additional pages, and thus, is not considered a viable method for use in scrapbook bind–unless the size of the scrapbook is well designed and no additional page inclusion will be needed.

Saddle-Stitching -

saddle stitch book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThis method of binding is similar to the previous three methods accept the signatures are nested one inside another versus being stacked one signature on top of another, and then stitched through the fold with thin wire staples.  This method is possible for completed scrapbooks with long term need in mind.  Saddle-stitched books can lie flat , but have no spine upon which a title could be printed.  These bound books are generally limited to no more than 80 pages.

Side-Stitching -

side stitch book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksSide stitched books are created and bound by assembling loose sheets of paper and stapling them together, or literally stitching them.  A cover can  enfold the bound stack and glued.  Depending on the bound thickness, the spine may be thick enough to allow for a side stitch book binding2 Ways You Can Bind Your Scrapbooksprinted title.  This method is not well suited for scrapbooks because the binding does not allow for the book to lie flat or for inclusion of additional pages.  Magazines or booklets, like National Geographic utilize this method of binding.


The next set of methods presented here are ones you could produce on your own (with the assistance of some simple tools), or purchased inexpensively from an office supply or craft store.

GBC Binding (sometimes referred to as comb binding) -

comb book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksOne of the advantages of this binding method is in the ability of the completed book to lie flat–something scrapbook crafters desire.  The binding process is fairly simple.  Holes are punched along the side where the binding is preferred.  A plastic comb (a cylinder with plastic fingers that are flexible to open) is inserted into the corresponding holes.  Another feature or benefit to paper crafters is the ability to add pages to the completed project.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Wire-O Binding -

wire o book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksWire-O binding is a succession of  parallel looped wire affixed along a wire which are passed through holes punched in the stacked papers–similar to the GBC Binding method noted above.   This method of binding has size limitations for its use . . . less than for the GBC Binding method, but does allow for the addition of pages not to exceed its size limitation, or for a title to be placed on the binding.  This binding does allow for the completed project to lie flat when open.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Wire Spiral Binding -

wire spiral book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThe Spiral binding method is very similar to the Wire-O method accept a spiral wire is worked through the corresponding holes punched on one side of the project.  This binding does not allow being able to put a title on the binding–which could be a deterrent for some.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Plastic Coil Binding -

spiral book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThis binding method is the same as the Spiral Binding method noted above except a plastic spiral material is used versus wire which can be crushed.  The flexibility of the plastic gives the finished book a measure of versatility wire does not give, and you can select from a variety of colors.  If the wire spiral is crushed the opening and closing of the book is compromised.

Tape Binding -

tape book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksTape binding is a method, sometimes referred to as Thermabind or thermal tape binding,  is a process which uses a fabric tape strip that is pre-coated with a durable, heat–activated glue to hold or bind the pages together.  This type of binding is  not normally used in scrapbook binding.    The glue strip tape is wrapped around the front & back covers of the book block, extending to about a half-inch to an inch on the back and front sheets.  The glue strip is then heated to bond the tape to the book.  The best practice is to use a tape binding machine (The cost of a binding machine generally makes this process cost prohibitive for most scrapbook applications–but machines can be purchased for as little as $99.)  which centers your book’s binding edge on the tape, and completes the process by melting the glue. The material becomes bound once the glue has cooled.  Thermal tape binding strips come in a variety of colors and size ranges to accommodate a variety of book thicknesses from 3 to 600 sheets of 20 lb.  paper.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Screw and Post Binding -

screw  post book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThe Screw and Post Binding method is one most familiar to scrapbook crafters.  These books are the “backbone” of the scrapbook portfolio.  They can be purchased for a nominal cost.  Their drawbacks can be in the lack of being able to customize or personalize them and the capacity limits.  Creating your own book using the Screw and Post Binding method is not difficult.  The process is very similar to side stitching process, but metal post and screws are used to bind your papers.  One nice element to this type bound book is the ability to add or remove pages easily.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Velo Binding -

velo book binding Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThe Velo Binding method is identified by the flat plastic strip which runs the length of the bound edge on both the front and back sides of the book.  Thin pegs attach the two plastic strips  through the pages of the book.  Click here for more detailed information . . .

Ring-binders -

ring bound book Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksThe Ring-binder method is simple and straight forward.  Most of us are familiar with the ringed binders we use in school and at the office.  Usually made with 3 metal (sometimes plastic) rings enclosed in a cloth bound or vinyl cover.  Ring-binder’s are versatile and allow for ease in adding or removing pages.  These uncomplicated books can be purchased at a nominal price at many shops: craft, office supply, grocery stores, etc.

rollabind process1 Ways You Can Bind Your ScrapbooksRollabind is admired for its innovative binding systems, Rollabind has gained a following among multi-taskers searching for solutions that adapt to, rather than dictate, their lifestyles. Rollabind notebooks are used as diaries, personal journals, organizers, day planners and scrapbooks. Rollabind provides paper punches that allow you to create your own pages or insert any document into your notebook or scrapbook.   Click here for more detailed information . . .

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Ron on February 4th, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbook Binding Methods – Screw and Post Binding

screw  post book binding1 Scrapbook Binding Methods – Screw and Post Binding

The Screw and Post Binding method is perhaps the most familiar to scrapbook crafters along with the ring-binder.  These books are the “backbone” of the scrapbook portfolio.  They can be purchased for a nominal cost.  Their drawbacks to “store bought albums” can be in the lack of being able to customize or personalize their covers, and their capacity limits.  Creating your own book using the Screw and Post Binding method is not difficult.  screw  post bound book graphic Scrapbook Binding Methods – Screw and Post BindingThe process is very similar to side stitching process (see article on Side Stitch Binding), but metal post and screws are used to bind your papers.  One nice element to this type bound book or album is the ability to add or remove pages easily.

Some basic information about binding screw and posts:

screw posts Scrapbook Binding Methods – Screw and Post Binding

Screw & Post Fasteners

  • These post and screws are sometimes referred to as Chicago binding screw or post clamp.
  • The most popular variety is made from aluminum, but can come in plastic, brass and steel–in addition to coming in colors.
  • The set come in two pieces–a binding screw and binding post or barrel post.  The binding screw is twisted, or screwed into the binding post.
  • The binding post or barrel come in various heights to provide appropriate paper capacities: 1/8″ up to 4″
  • The post or barrel is 3/16″ in diameter and will fit into 1/4″ punched or drilled holes, or the 5/16″ sized hole produced with a standard 3-hole paper punch.
  • The screw is 7/16′ in diameter.
  • You can purchase extensions to expand your scrapbooks/albums should the need arise.

These options may not be what you are looking for.  Click here to visit our web-page on other scrapbook binding options, or go to our alphabetical subject page above and click on the “S” to see information on other binding pages; or there are two good informational websites you can go to if you want to make your own scrapbook albums using Screw and Post binding with Instructables or Alternative Photography’s site.

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Ron on February 3rd, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

ring bound book1 Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

The Ring-binder method is simple and straight forward.  Most of us are familiar with the ringed binders we use in school and at the office.  Usually made with 3 metal (sometimes plastic) rings enclosed in a cloth bound or vinyl cover.  Ring-binder’s are versatile and allow for ease in adding or removing pages.  These uncomplicated books can be purchased at a nominal price at many shops: craft, office supply, grocery stores, etc.

binder ring round Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

Round Binder Ring

binder D ring Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

D-ring Binder

binder elliptical ring Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

Elliptical Ring Binder

binder single ring Scrapbook Binding Methods – Ring Binding

Single Ring Binder

There are essentially three types of ring binders:  the ring binder (where the rings are cylindrical); the d-ring (where the ring has a straight elongated side to keep pages from rounding over; and elliptical overlapping ring (where the rings are cylindrical, usually made of plastic or PVC and the ends that open for page insertion lap over each other).  Which type you choose to use may be more dependent on the size and utility of your scrapbook.  Each of these options will accommodate page stacks up to 3″ (as measured from the top of the ring to the binder base.  For scrapbook use, you most likely wouldn’t want to use a ring binder over 2″.

For scrapbooks you want binders that will hold your 12″ x 12″ completed scrapbook pages.  These size binders will actually be larger than 12″ x 12″ with added size to keep your pages from being disturbed when handling.  Most commercial ring binders come with three rings.  Smaller sized binders may have only two.  Hand made ring binders can be made with loose leaf 3-ring binders (round or d-ring), elliptical rings, or 2 or three single rings.  The choice is yours.

These options may not be what you are looking for.  Click here to visit our web-page on other scrapbook binding options, or go to our alphabetical subject page above and click on the “S” to see information on other binding pages.

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Ron on February 2nd, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbook Binding Methods – GBC or Comb Binding

GBC Binding or Comb Binding

comb book binding1 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

One of the advantages of this binding method is for the ability of the completed book to lie flat–something scrapbook crafters desire.  The binding process is fairly simple.  Holes are punched along the side where the binding is preferred.  A plastic comb (a cylinder with plastic fingers that are flexible to open)  is inserted into the corresponding holes.  Another feature or benefit to paper crafters is the ability to add pages to the completed project.

GBC Binding (named because of the company GBC–a major binding machine and supply manufacturer) is one of several methods used for binding books–including scrapbooks.  The process of this type of book binding is relatively uncomplicated, but is best done with the help of a binding machine.

Comb binding utilizes round plastic spines in varying sizes and colors to create the bind.  These spines have 19 comb fingers for a standard U.S. letter sized sheet of paper (8 1/2″ x 11″).  Each comb of the spine is inserted into rectangular punched holes in the document to be bound.  The springy nature of the plastic cylinder of fingers retains the coil to hold the sheets together.

Here is how the Comb binding process is done:

Step 1

comb binding punched holes Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb BindingThe first step in binding your scrapbook will be to punch the holes on the spine side (where you want the binding to be) of your pages.  Here is where having a comb binding machine comes in handy.  A comb binding machine will produce uniform rectangular holes evenly spaced (approximately 19 holes for a standard U.S. letter sized[8 1/2" x 11"]  sheet of paper–which corresponds to the number of “fingers” on a binding comb ring.   When punching standard 12″ x 12″ scrapbook pages you will need to center the punches.  Most punching machines have a guide to allow for centering the punches on your sheets.  When punching the holes be careful not to over extend the capacity of the punching machine or tool.  You may well be better served to reduce the number of sheets you punch at a time.  What you want are clean, neat and uniform rectangular punches.  Imperfect punching will make your finished binding less functional.

Step 2

comb binding spines Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb BindingWith holes punched, you want to select a comb spine that will accommodate the size or thickness of your scrapbook to be bound.  When selecting your spine bigger is always better . . . allowing for easier opening and “paging”  or flipping through your pages without the spine catching your pages.  Comb spines come in thickness ranging from 3/16″ up to 2″ as standard, and in a wide array of colors.  The standard length of spines is 11″ which means on a 12″ x 12″ scrapbook page you will have to center your spine.  If you plan to add pages to your scrapbook, you will be best served to use a larger sized spine to accommodate these pages which may be added at some later date.

Step 3

This last step is the assembly of your bound book.  The fingers or combs on the binding spine open out.  You need to insert one finger into each punched hole through all of the pages of your book.  The fingers or comb should be rested under the spine to secure your pages.

comb bind step1 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

Machine opening the spine.

comb bind step2 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

Spine rings through holes.

comb bind step3 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

Rings closed on paper.

comb bind step4 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

Completed book.

 

The addition of a stiff cover and backing to your scrapbook can be added during the process noted above.  The backing should be the first page on the spine, followed by your scrapbook pages, and concluding with the cover page.

This method of scrapbook binding can be done without the use of a binding machine, but quality results are best obtained when a machine is used for punching and opening of the spine to insert your scrapbook pages.  Here are some machines that are reasonable in price for the serious scrapbook crafter who plans to do a fair amount of binding to justify the cost.  Click on the photograph to get details on the particular machine/system:

 GBC or Comb Binding Machines

 

GBC Manual Comb Binding Machine-C55

gbc manual binding machine C55  Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

GBC Manual Binding Machine C55

The GBC CombBind C55 manual plastic comb binding machine features a 5-sheet manual punch capacity plus 90-sheet binding capacity using plastic combs up to 1/2″. Rotary comb opening. Integrated carrying handle. Paper alignment guide.
GBC ProClick P50 Binding Machine

gbc proclick p50 binding machine   Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

GBC ProClick P50 Binding Machine

The GBC Proclick P50 Binding Machine is small enough to take with you in your car or even in your briefcase so that you can punch documents on the fly. The Proclick P50 uses a rotary punching mechanism that punches a 32 hole 3:1 pitch pattern that is compatible with GBC Proclick binding spines (It can even be used with 3:1 pitch color coil). Make a lasting impression with GBC’s fast, easy binding style. ProClick lasts pages lie flat with 360 degree rotation for convenient note taking and photocopying, and you can easily add and remove sheets with a ProClick editing tool. Binds up to 100 sheets.
GBC Manual Comb Binding Machine C110

gbc combind c110 Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

GBC ComBind C110 Manual Machine

Ideal for moderate use. Punches up to 15 sheets manually and binds up to 300 sheets. Full size handle and separate bind lever maximizes efficiency. A comb selection guide makes it easy to select a comb size. Accommodates oversize and standard size covers.
Fellowes Manual Combing Machine

fellowes comb binding machine Scrapbook Binding Methods   GBC or Comb Binding

Fellowes Manual Combing Machine

This manual binding machine is for occasional home, office, or student use, and will manually punch up to 7 sheets at a time.  This machine will bind up to 90 sheets with a 1/2” comb, and allows the user to punch and bind continuously for maximum productivity.  Paper is loaded vertically for accurate punch alignment.  There are adjustable edge guides to help  center documents with ease.  There is also a document thickness guide to help users select the proper comb width.  A built-in comb storage tray is provided for added convenience.

These options may not be what you are looking for.  Click here to visit our web-page on other scrapbook binding options, or go to our alphabetical subject page above and click on the “S” to see information on other binding pages.

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Ron on February 1st, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire-O Binding

Wire-O Binding

(Also Know as Double-O-Wire or Twin Loop Wire Binding)

wire o book binding1 Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

Wire-O binding is a succession of  parallel looped wire affixed along a wire which are passed through holes punched in stacked papers.   This method of binding has size limitations for its use . . . less than for the GBC Binding method.  This type of binding does allow for the completed project to lie flat when open, and could be a good option for binding your scrapbooks.

A Wire-O binding holds the covers and pages of a document firmly in place by the use of a double-loop wire inserted through holes drilled in your project’s edge or spine. In addition to all of the document’s pages being able to lay flat when opened, they can turn easily through 360°, and stay in perfect registration with adjoining pages.

Wire-O bindings come in a wide array of colors: nine standard colors and loop diameters from 3/16″ to 1-1/4″.   This binding system works well for documents from 1/8″ to 1″ thick. This system of binding is most often used to bind reference books, reports, proposals, and calendars, but equally can be used for scrapbooks of varying sizes. This method is a durable system.  However, there are some limitations–this method does not permit printing on the document spine or the insertion of new pages (adding pages requires the de-binding or undoing–adding your pages and then re-binding your project).   Another drawback for using this method of binding has to do with the binding spine loops being crushed–loosing their cylindrical shape–does not reshape itself like plastic coils and will require reshaping by hand.

Here is how the Comb binding process is done:

Like GBC binding or comb binding, wire-o binding is best accomplished with the use of a machine that will punch the required holes and set the double-wire binders.

Step 1

wire o punched holes Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

Punched Paper for Binding

wire o bind pitch Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

Bind Pitch (3:1)

Holes along the spine or bound side of the project must be drilled or punched.  Round , square or rectangular holes may be used.  These holes are spaced on a per inch ratio (3:1 or 2:1 – 3 or 2 holes per inch).  When drilling or punching your scrapbook pages be sure not to overload the machine. Also, proper alignment and uniform depth are a must.  Most binding machines will have gauges to assist you in meeting these requirements.

Step 2

wire o binding page order Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

Arrange Book for Binding

With your scrapbook pages now drilled or punched with the appropriate ratio (pitch) holes–including the front and back covers, you can now arrange your book with the back cover on the bottom, but will be the last page inserted in the binding machine.  Next, add succeeding pages–bottom pages to the top and finish the book with the top, or cover (this order will have both front and back cover together–but the back cover will hide the spine when completed).

Step 3

wire o binding pages1 Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

Organized Pages

wire o binding Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

Wire-o Rings

With your scrapbook sheets and covers now arranged in the order you want them to appear in your book, insert the double wire loops through the holes you have created with the punching process of the machine. The binding machine will assist you in holding the book to allow this process.

Step 4

wire o SircleBind WR 60 Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

Wire-o Binding Machine

With the double wire now inserted and binding your scrapbook, close–or set–the wire loops.  A binding machine will do this step easily, but you can close each ring individually if required without the use of a binding machine.

Step 5

wire o bound book Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

Finished Wire-o Binding

Your last step is to flip the “back page” over from the top or front of the book to the back.  Doing this will hide the spine of your binding.

This method of scrapbook binding can be done without the use of a binding machine, but is difficult and quality results are best obtained when a machine is used for punching and closing the spine to bind your scrapbook pages.  Here are some machines that are reasonable in price for the serious scrapbook crafter who plans to do a fair amount of binding to justify the cost, and prefers this method of binding.  Click on the photograph to get details on the particular machine/system:

Wire-o Binding Machines


Bind-it-All by Zutter Innovative Products

zutter bind it all Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

Zutter's Bind-It-All

The Zutter Bind-it-All is capable of handling any size O-wire that is available on the market. The Bind-it-All comes with a set of O-wire sizing templates for the following diameter sizes: 5/16, 3/8, 7/16, ½, 5/8, 3/4, 7/8, 1inch and 1 ¼ inch. In total, there are a total of 12 O-wire binding diameters available in the market. (1 1/4, 1 1/8, 1, 7/8, ¾, 5/8, 9/16, ½, 7/16, 3/8, 5/16, 1/4.) The Bind-it-All is capable of applying all 12 sizes, from the very smallest ¼” all the way to 1 1/4″ in diameter. We also offer 8 colors of O-wire (White, Black, Silver, Antique Brass, Antique Silver, Red, Baby Blue and Baby Pink).
SIRCLE WR-60 Manual Wire Binding Machine

wire o SircleBind WR 60 Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

SircleBind WR-60 Binding Machine

With its compact size, handle-bar lock which allows for compact storage space, the SircleBind WR-60 Wire Binding Machine is an ideal choice for the scrapbook crafter and home user. This wire binding machine is an economical choice built with functionality through capacity, and durability through design.

SircleBind WR-60 Binding Machine Specifications:

    Binding system: O-Wire (34 loops)
    Punching capacity: 6 sheets
    Max. Bind: 6mm (45 sheets)
    Margin depth setting
    Cutting Die adjustment
    Special function: Wire closer
DocuGem Manual 3:1 Wire & Plastic Comb Binding Machine

DocuGem manual binding machine Scrapbook Binding Methods – Wire O Binding

DocuGem Manual 3:1 Wire & Plastic Comb Binding Machine

The DocuGem Manual 3:1 Wire & Plastic Comb Binding Machine has the unique ability to perform as a plastic comb (Spiral-O Wire) binding machine and also accommodates Double Loop Wire. The 2 IN 1 Bind system is an affordable way to combine two great binding methods. Plastic Comb binding is a cost-effective method with the advantage of being able to re-open, removing and adding pages as needed. Double Loop wire binding provides an attractive, permanent binding solution.

DocuGem Manual 3:1 Wire & Plastic Comb Binding Machine

Specifications and Features:

    Plastic Comb, 19 Loop Spiral-O Wire & 3:1 Double Loop Wire Combination Machine
    Punches 19 Rectangle holes or Punches 32 round holes
    Punches up to 15 sheets of 20# paper
    Max Binding Capacity 425 sheets for Plastic Comb, and 250 sheets for Wire
    11″ vertical punch
    Compact for easy storage

These options may not be what you are looking for.  Click here to visit our web-page on other scrapbook binding options, or go to our alphabetical subject page above and click on the “S” to see information on other binding pages.

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Ron on January 31st, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -

Scrapbook Binding Methods – Tape Binding

Tape or Thermal Binding

(Thermabind)

thermal bound scrapbook Scrapbook Binding Methods   Tape Binding

Tape binding is a method, sometimes referred to as Thermabind or thermal tape binding.  Tape binding is a process which uses a fabric tape strip that is pre-coated with a durable, heat–activated glue to hold or bind the pages together.  This type of binding is  not normally used in scrapbook binding.    The glue strip tape is wrapped around the front & back covers of the book block, extending to about a half-inch to an inch on the back and front sheets.  The glue strip is then heated to bond the tape to the book.  The best practice is to use a tape binding machine. (The cost of a binding machine generally makes this process cost prohibitive for most scrapbook applications–but machines can be purchased for as little as $99.)  which centers your book’s binding edge on the tape, and completes the process by melting the glue.  The material becomes bound once the glue has cooled.  Thermal tape binding strips come in a variety of colors and size ranges to accommodate a variety of book thicknesses from 3 to 600 sheets of 20 lb.  paper.

Hand Tape Thermal Binding

Step 1

organized paper stack1 Scrapbook Binding Methods   Tape Binding

Organized Scrapbook Pages

jogging paper1 Scrapbook Binding Methods   Tape Binding

Jogging Paper

Arrange your pages–including a front and back cover–in the order you want them.  Jog the pages (taping them on a hard or firm surface so that all of the pages are even along one side–the spine side) to get all of the pages uniform across the where the binding will be made.

Step 2

sanding book spine Scrapbook Binding Methods   Tape Binding

Hand Sanding Book Spine

Clamp the jogged pages to keep them in their uniform position.  With the help of sanding (hand or with an electric hand sander) rough up the back (spine) of your pages.  This process will help more glue to hold you bound pages together.

Step 3

glueing book spine Scrapbook Binding Methods   Tape Binding

Adding Glue to Scrapbook Spine

Apply a pre-glued tape spine to your clamped pages, and then apply heat to melt the glue to the spine edge.  Wait for the glue to cool and dry thoroughly.  While the glue on your pages is drying, fold the cover to match your spine. Keep the entire book securely held until the glue is completely dried.

Glue Gun Method:

Follow the steps above for the Tape Binding method, but make these simple adjustments:

 

glue gun Scrapbook Binding Methods   Tape Binding

Glue Gun

When applying the glue use a hot glue gun with at least a 1/16 inch nozzle, and run a bead of glue down the spine in a curvy line. Making sure to get good coverage on the entire spine, but don’t be overly excessive with the glue. Let the glue dry. Add your cover over the dried glue. With a heated iron go over the cover and spine to re-melt the glue. You may want to add a piece of paper between your binding and the iron to prevent scorching your cover. Then allow your scrapbook to cool.

 

Binding with Thermal Binding Machines

Thermal binding your scrapbook can be much easier with the help of a thermal binding machine. Depending on the device, there are sometimes just three steps to the process, but you need to check the procedures with each machine because they may vary.  There are great thermal covers available–including ones that have windows cut into them so you can show off a title page.   Once you use one, you’ll wonder why you ever used anything else.  Click on the photographs below to get details on the particular machine/system:

Thermal Binding Machines

Helios Thermal Binding Machine

fellows helios thermal binding machine Scrapbook Binding Methods   Tape Binding

Fellows Helios Thermal Binding Machine

Ideal for medium duty home, office or desktop use. Rapid 30-60 second binding cycle with one-minute heat up. HeatGuard technology reduces surface heat so binder is always safe to touch. Indicates when machine is ready and beeps when binding is done.
Fellowes Helios 60 Thermal Binding Machine

fellows helios 60 thermal binding machine Scrapbook Binding Methods   Tape Binding

Fellowes Helios 60 Thermal Binding Machine

deal for medium duty home, office or desktop use. Rapid 30-60 second binding cycle with one-minute heat up. HeatGuard” technology reduces surface heat so binder is always safe to touch. Indicates when machine is ready and beeps when binding is done. Auto shut-off safety feature prevents overheating. Folds flat for storage. Binding Spine Type: Thermal; Binding Sheet Capacity: 600; Punching Sheet Capacity

These options may not be what you are looking for.  Click here to visit our web-page on other scrapbook binding options, or go to our alphabetical subject page above and click on the “S” to see information on other binding pages.

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Ron on January 30th, 2011 | File Under Binder/Laminator, Helpful Products, Scrapbooking | No Comments -